Aug 31

From Paolo Villoresi … First of all let me mention my friend Jacopo Falleni, great Florentine mixologist who will give us very nice drinks; he promises he will make our drinks come true….for a long time! Will Levitt continues his very interesting series of the Italian-Americans, the people who first brought the Italian Cuisine in America and another homage from one of my dear friends and great photographer Jeanne Newman “An Homage to Women”. I wrote about a very good Neapolitan Panino, a very good recipe for any Lunch Box …

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Aug 24
2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
6 thin slices pancetta, diced
1 small onion, diced
11⁄2 c. frozen green peas
3⁄4 c. chicken stock, plus extra
1 c. tomato purée
salt and freshly ground pepper
1 lb. rigatoni
1⁄4 c. Grana Padano, freshly grated

1. In a large skillet over medium heat, warm the olive oil. 2. Add the pancetta and sauté until golden brown. Add the onions and cook until translucent. Stir in the peas and cook for 2 minutes. Add the chicken stock and bring to a boil. Mix in the tomato purée and season with salt and freshly ground pepper. Cook for 10 minutes, or until it reduces to a sauce consistency. 3. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add salt and the pasta and cook until al dente. 4. Drain the pasta and add it to the skillet with the sauce. Season with salt and freshly ground pepper and transfer to a serving platter. Sprinkle with the Grana Padano and serve. Serves 4

Replace: pancetta with unsmoked bacon
Replace: Grana Padano with Parmigiano-Reggiano
Rule of Thumb: 6 qt. of water and 2 tbsp. of salt for 1 lb. of pasta
Light to medium-bodied red wine, such as Primitivo or Sangiovese
.

1. Sauté the pancetta in olive oil until golden brown. Add the onions and sauté until translucent. Add the peas and cook for 2 minutes. Add the chicken stock and bring to a boil.
2. Add the tomato purée, season with salt and freshly ground pepper and cook for 10 minutes
3. Cook the rigatoni in boiling, salted water. Drain and add to the sauce. Toss and serve topped with grated Grana.

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Aug 10

1 can artichoke hearts
1⁄2 c. green olives, pitted
1⁄2 hot red pepper
salt and freshly ground pepper
2 tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
1⁄2 c. black olives, pitted
1 focaccia

1. Chop 1⁄2 the artichokes together with the green olives and hot red pepper until finely diced. 2. Transfer to a bowl and season with salt and freshly ground pepper. Add 1⁄2 the olive oil, mix to combine and set aside. 3. Chop the remaining artichokes with the black olives. 4. Transfer to a bowl and season with salt and freshly ground pepper. Add the remaining olive oil, mix to combine and set aside. 5. Slice the focaccia into 2-inch squares and alternate topping with the green olive mixture and black olive mixture. Serves 4 to 6

Replace: canned artichoke hearts with fresh or frozen artichokes
Remove: hot red pepper or remove the seeds and ribbing of the pepper for a milder flavor

Medium to full-bodied white wine, such as Verdicchio

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Aug 3

Yes, the black seeds of papayas are edible and have a peppery taste. Although they are not usually eaten, the seeds are great for making a spicy vinaigrette salad dressing.

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